5 Ways to Style dl

Recently I lamented the rare usage of the supremely useful directory list, dl. The directory list is a pretty common data structure: one heading, followed by one or more related subsidiary data. It’s appropriate for more situations than it’s used for, probably because so many developers fixate on markup’s visual design rather than its informationContinue reading “5 Ways to Style dl”

Finger Busting

The other night my husband and I indulged in some old-fashioned diversion by picking through our collection of 78 r.p.m. records, playing the selections on the 1947 Delco phonograph. He surprised me with a record I’d forgotten we had: Jelly Roll Morton, late in his career, playing Willie “The Lion” Smith’s “Finger Buster;” B-side, “CreepyContinue reading “Finger Busting”

I Still (Heart) RichInStyle

I’ve been perusing a lot of job postings, which is, I know, inefficient, if my goal is to find a job, but it’s interesting to see what employers are putting in their requirements. More and more frequently I’m seeing a call for skill with frameworks–not just for Ruby on Rails or Prototype, but also forContinue reading “I Still (Heart) RichInStyle”

In Praise of dl

Consider the task of delivering this: It’s a construct you’ll see everywhere on the Web: a text heading in bold type, with perhaps some background styling, and subsidiary text beneath it, often styled a little differently, such as in a lighter font style. The heading and the content beneath it seem to be related; visualContinue reading “In Praise of dl”

Ada Lovelace Day: the women of keypunch

Think of most large- or medium-scale processes, like assembling all the grades of the freshman class, or billing the customers of the gigantic Bell System: punched cards, and keypunch operators, were behind them.